The Depression Gender Gap

  • Published28 Jun 2019
  • Author Alexis Wnuk
  • Source BrainFacts/SfN

Around the world, women are more likely than men to be diagnosed with depression. Scientists aren’t sure why this gender gap exists but think it involves both biological differences — genes and hormones — and social factors like stress, poverty, and social status.

Infographic Illustrating Depression Statistics in the Context of Gender
Design by A. Tong; Reporting by A. Wnuk

Art and design by Adrienne Tong. Reporting by Alexis Wnuk.

Additional reporting and editing by Lynnie Fein-Schaffer, Hannah Zuckerman, and Juliet Beverly.

Created with support from the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at Broad Institute.

Content Provided By

BrainFacts/SfN

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